March 2, 2024

 

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Sexual orientation refers to the emotional, sexual or emotional attraction that one feels towards another person. There are four main types of sexual orientation;

  • Homosexual

Homosexual persons are romantically and physically attracted to individuals of the same sex.

  • Bisexual

Bisexual people are physically and romantically attracted to members of same gender

  • Heterosexual

Heterosexual refers to people who are emotionally and physically attracted to members of opposite sex.

  • Asexual

These group covers individuals who are not interested in sex, but they feel emotionally attracted to other people

  • Bisexual

Bisexual persons are romantically and physically attracted to members of both sexes

LGBT, abbreviation for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender is used to describe sexual orientation. Although transgender is more of a gender identity than sexual orientation, these individuals fall under LGBT because they do not fit in the category of being heterosexual or “straight”. For LGBT persons, it often feels as if everyone is supposed to be straight porno.

1.   Psychological and Social Issues

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Gay and lesbian adults confess of feeling ashamed, isolated and afraid of being identified as different during their adolescent years. These emotions can potentially impact on self-esteem and identity formation. According to studies, approximately half of gay people and a fifth of lesbians confess to experiencing verbal and physical assault in high school due to their orientation. Such harassments elevate the likely hood of dropping out of school. Homosexual individuals can also face harassment at home and have a higher risk of being kicked out of their homes and moving to the streets than their heterosexual counterparts.

2.   Difficult Relationships

It is during adolescent and teenage phases that young people learn to relate to peers and potential romantic and sexual partners. This is often complicated for homosexuals and bisexual teens because they lack models of same sex relationships. These teens find it a challenge to meet someone who may be interested, the process of dating, how to flirt and how to introduce the element of sex to the relationship.

3.   Challenges in Accessing Medical Care

Like their heterosexual peers, LGBT youth have the same health care needs that are not necessarily linked to their sexual orientation. However, LGBT persons continue to experience challenges in accessing healthcare services. Some attest to experiencing difficulty in finding hormone replacement therapy, fertility and reproductive services, HIV prevention and treatment options and finding a welcoming primary care service. Others confess discriminatory treatment by health care providers.

4.   Harassment Victimization and Violence

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LGBT youth report experiencing increased levels of harassment, victimization, and violence, including, physical, verbal and sexual abuse. These experiences are also related to substance use, psychological health problems as well as sexual risk-taking behaviour. Scholl-based bullying, harassment and peer victimization based on known or perceived gender identity and sexual orientation remain common. Studies shows that youth who exhibit gender-atypical behaviour or open up about their sexual orientation are prone to becoming targets of victimization. Such harassment victimization and violence lead to mental health issues and posttraumatic stress symptoms.

5.   Family Issues

LGBT teens who are in the process of identifying with their sexual orientation often find it a challenge to disclose to their parents about their orientation. They dislike the fact that they are lying to their parents yet worry about their parent’s reactions. Some teens worry about the possible negative repercussions of disclosing their orientation to their parents.