10 Most Important LGBTQ Achievements

10 Most Important LGBTQ

LGBTQ rights have come a long way. As everyone is focused on the issues the community faces currently and looking to address them, it’s important to remember where we’ve come from. Looking back, you will notice that the rights accorded to the community were once a daydream. Here are the key historical milestone achievements of the LGBTQ rights movement. 

 

1924 – The first gay rights group is established

Henry Gerber, world war I veteran, established the Society for Human Rights in Chicago. The group was the first organization to ever champion gay rights in America. It ran a newsletter titled “Friendship and Freedom,” the first-ever recorded gay rights publication. 

 

1958 – The Supreme Court rules in favor of gay rights

Most Important LGBTQ

A court case was launched against the US Post Office after it refused to deliver America’s first widely distributed pro-gay publication, ONE: The Homosexual Magazine porno xxx. The Post Office and FBI had declared the magazine as obscene material. When the Supreme Court ruled in favor of homosexuals, it was a significant stride for the community. 

 

1973 – Homosexuality is no longer considered a mental illness

Following years of studies and changes in cultural perceptions, the American Psychiatric Association’s board of directors removed homosexuality from the official list of mental illnesses. 

 

2000 – Vermont makes a massive stride towards legalization of same-sex marriages

Vermont was the first state to offer same-sex couples the right to enter civil unions. The legal partnerships allowed gay couples the same rights and benefits as heterosexual marriages. 

 

2013 – SCOTUS abolishes the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA)

The DOMA act, established in 1996, stated that the federal government did not recognize marriages between lesbian and gay couples. It meant that the couples couldn’t enjoy legal benefits like health insurance and social security. The abolishment of the DOMA act meant that same-sex couples married within their states could enjoy these federal benefits. 

 

2015 – The death of conversion therapy

The tragic suicide of a transgender teenager forced to undergo Christian conversion therapy hit the nation hard. After this incident, President Obama called for an end of this practice. It was no longer okay for anyone to try changing a person’s gender identity through conversion therapy. 

 

2015 – Love wins 

10 Most Important LGBTQ Achievements

The Supreme Court declared same-sex marriage as a constitutional right nationwide. Therefore, all states were required to permit Americans to get married irrespective of their sexual orientation or gender. 

 

2015 – The military allows transgender Americans to serve openly 

Ashton Carter, US Defense Secretary, announced that the army had lifted a ban that prevented transgender individuals from serving in the armed forces. Unfortunately, President Trump rescinded this right in 2019. As of 2021, however, transgender individuals are now allowed to work in the military again. 

 

2019: New York City honors LGBTQ activists with monuments

New York City erected a monument in Greenwich dedicated to two LGBTQ activists, Marsha P. Johnson and Sylvia Rivera. They both played a vital role in the Stonewall riots and the NYC queer scene. 

 

2020: The Supreme Court expands the law to protect LGBTQ against workplace discrimination

After hearing three individual cases from two gay men and one transgender woman, the Supreme Court ruled 6:3 for expanding the 1964 civil acts law. The clause was amended to protect the rights of sexual minorities and transgender people from workplace discrimination. 

 

 

 

US Campaigns supporting the LGTB human and civil rights

On March 4, the Ed Rendell for PA Governor campaign held a luncheon in the Rivers Club at One Oxford Center for the lgbt community. Nine members of the community and four campaign staff attended the lunch. Richard Meritzer, who represented GSPC, said that the other lgbt organizations represented included the Marriage Coalition, League of Gay and Lesbian Voters, and Persad. While the organizations were predominantly political ones, Meritzer also noted that the community was represented predominantly by white men.

In his introductory speech, Rendell talked about his support for the right of hospital visitation for lgbt people and his support for reversing the law that forbids Pitt to offer domestic partnership rights. He said that, as governor, he would support domestic partnership for state employees.

The luncheon was then opened for discussion, in which Rendell expressed the following: He supports hate crime legislation and employment non-discrimination legislation. He supports adoption reform. He said he would enforce the executive order protecting state employees from discrimination. He was unfamiliar with the recent issue Pittsburgh had over people with AIDS confidentiality. He said that protecting anonymity of people was very important and no amount of research should compromise this protection. He said that his campaign would provide assistance to lgbt groups but only if they provided a good business plan. He promised that during his administration there would be regular relations with the Governor’s office.

GSPCGP Endorses Rendell for PA Governor, Kukovich for Lt. Governor

The Gertrude Stein Political Club of Greater Pittsburgh (GSPC) has endorsed Ed Rendell (Dem) for Pennsylvania governor in the Primary Election scheduled for May 21. Rendell supports covering the lgbt community in the state’s Hate Crime legislation. Allen G. Kukovich (Dem), who has been endorsed for Lt. Governor of PA, was instrumental in passing the hate crime legislation in the PA Senate. This legislation will soon be up for a vote by the representatives in the General Assembly. In choosing candidates to support in the General Assembly, the Stein Club especially looked for incumbents dedicated to passing the bill.

Of the incumbents, GSPCGP endorsed Dan B. Frankel (Dem) in district 23 and Joseph Preston, Jr. (Dem) in district 24. Jake Wheatley (Dem) in district 19 and Mike Crossey (Dem) in district 42 have also been endorsed for representatives in the General Assembly. GSPCGP recognizes Patrick Dowd of the Democratic party with Honorable Mention. Dowd is running against Preston to represent district 24.

Two viable candidates in the Democratic party are running to fill the PA Senate seat in district 38: Jim Ferlo, who received the Stein Club endorsement, and Bonnie DiCarlo, who received Honorable Mention by the Club. The Club also endorsed the following candidates for Pennsylvania Democratic State Committee: Brenda Frazier and Sandra Roberts in district 38; Robert V. Frank in district 42; Barbara Danko, Richard Fitzgerald, Marvin Leibowitz, Michael McGeever, and Scott Safier in district 43; and Carmella Mullen in district 45.